What’s the Difference Between a Migraine and a Headache

Many migraine sufferers have their problems compounded by those who don’t fully understand the difference between a migraine and a headache. Many people believe that a migraine is just a “bad headache”, which is an oversimplification at best.

Of course, it’s difficult to know a pain you’ve never felt, and it’s difficult for anyone who’s never had a migraine to understand what makes these devastating incidents so disruptive.

Today, we’re going to dive into the difference between a migraine and a headache, how to tell the difference, and how to treat each.

What Exactly is a Headache?

Headaches are fairly common, and can affect anyone of any age. They can be a mild to intense pain that typically affect both sides of the head.

Headaches are typically most intense around the temples, forehead, and the back of the neck where your spine connects to your skull.

Headaches can be brought on by a myriad of factors, including sinus issues, stress, muscle tension, poor diet, and various other issues.

What Exactly is a Migraine?

A migraine is a much more severe form of headache that comes bundled with a group of other symptoms that can include:

● Nausea
● Pain behind one eye or ear
● Pain in the temples
● Seeing spots or flashing lights
● Sensitivity to light and/or sound
● Temporary vision loss
● Vomiting

Migraines range from moderate to severe on the pain scale and can make performing everyday tasks difficult to impossible. Many people end up seeking emergency room care for severe migraines, especially if they’ve never experienced one before.

Migraines are also harder to treat, and typically last longer than a tension or sinus headache. The extra symptoms such as nausea and vomiting can make it difficult to keep medicine down as well.

Difference Between a Migraine and a Headache

The primary difference between a migraine and a regular headache is the severity of the pain. A full-fledged migraine will involve pain that is much more severe. Migraine sufferers also have to deal with other symptoms such as nausea.

Migraines can also present with an “aura” which includes other sensory issues such as sensitivity to lights or sound, tingling sensation in the extremities, seeing flashing lights, and even depression and mood swings. This can make it difficult to deal with, or treat migraines, but it does give a very good litmus test: if you have aura symptoms, you’re having or about to have a migraine.

Treating a Headache

Headaches can typically be treated very well with over-the-counter medication, and only rarely require professional medical help. Some effective medications include:

● Acetaminophen
● Aspirin
● Ibuprofen
● Caffeine

There are a number of other treatments that have been shown to help as well, including neck stretching, relaxation techniques, meditation, and warm compresses/showers. These are all fairly effective for treating stress or tension headaches.

If you have a sudden severe or unusually persistent headache, contact your doctor immediately as this may be the sign of a serious condition such as migraines, stroke, or other neurological issue.

Treating a Migraine

Migraine treatment is typically much more involved than the treatment for a headache. Typical headache treatments will be minimally effective at best, and will do almost nothing to prevent a migraine.

Unfortunately, there’s not much that can be done to break a migraine headache at home, so you’ll want to identify your migraine triggers if at all possible and then do whatever you can to avoid them.

Common triggers include:
● Alcohol
● Caffeine
● Aged Cheeses or other Aged Foods
● Stress

Beyond that, there are several medication options for treating migraines, but you’ll need to visit a doctor for them. These include:

● Antinausea medicines, such as promethazine (Phenergan), chlorpromazine (Thorazine), or prochlorperazine (Compazine).
● Triptans, such as almotriptan (Axert), rizatriptan (Maxalt), or sumatriptan (Alsuma, Imitrex, and Zecuity).
Finally, there have been several studies that have shown that botox injections are extremely effective at preventing migraine headaches in chronic sufferers.

Migraine Treatment from Doctor Binder

If you are interested in botox injections for migraine treatment, contact Doctor William J. Binder today! Doctor Binder is the pioneer of botox for migraine treatments, and is considered the foremost authority on the application of botox for this purpose.

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Botox for Migraines

For years, migraine sufferers have dealt with limited or ineffective treatment options for their condition. Sadly, medication options are few in number, and other alternative treatments are marginally effective at best. Fortunately, Botox for migraines can offer safe, effective, long-term relief.

Botox, long used as a way for cosmetic surgeons to bring youthful-looking skin to patients, can now also be used to combat chronic migraines and bring relief to patients that may not have another effective option for treatment. Doctor William Binder pioneered this technique after noticing that Botox patients who also suffered from migraines reported fewer and less severe migraines following their Botox treatment. The treatment has since been adopted by a number of physicians to help bring relief to their patients.

Migraines or Headaches?

There’s sometimes a bit of confusion about what exactly the difference is between a migraine and a regular headache. Neither are particularly fun, but migraines are considerably worse. Migraines can come with nausea, vomiting, pain behind the eyes or on one side of the head, sensitivity to light, smell, touch, and sound, lightheadedness, and blurry vision. Think of it this way: if a headache is an air horn, a migraine is a train horn. Some other migraine symptoms include:

● Constipation
● Mood changes, from depression to euphoria
● Food cravings
● Neck stiffness
● Increased thirst and urination
● Frequent yawning

Causes of Migraines

There are a wide variety of things that can cause a migraine. These triggers can include hormonal changes, particularly in women on a hormonal contraceptive, or other individuals undergoing hormone replacement, aged cheese and other salty or overly processed food, food additives such as MSG and aspartame, alcohol (particularly wines with a high sulfite content), stress, skipping regular meals, changes in sleep habits/lack of sleep, and other physical factors such as exertion or head and spinal trauma. Many people also report migraines following changing weather and rapidly shifting barometric pressure.

How Botox Works

Botox is the most commonly used brand of the industrially produced botulinum neurotoxin that is formulated from the Clostridium botulinum bacteria. Neurotoxin? Bacteria? It sounds a little scary when you think about it that way, but it’s actually completely safe when used by medical professionals. In fact, botulinum toxin is one of the most widely used and understood tools in a cosmetic surgeon’s arsenal, and it has been so for decades.

Botox works by essentially interrupting nerve impulses to muscles. This prevents individual muscles and muscle groups from contracting, which in turn causes wrinkles and frown lines to soften and smooth out. This treatment lasts 3-4 months, and can be reapplied as necessary. The side-effects for using Botox in this way are minimal and usually only include a bit of bruising at the injection site.

Botox for Migraines

Around 1992, Dr. William J Binder began conducting several studies to dig deeply into the usage of Botox for treating facial wrinkles. During this study, Dr. Binder noticed pronounced improvement in patients that suffered from migraines who underwent cosmetic Botox. Since then, Doctor Binder has become one of the world’s foremost authorities on Botox usage, and is arguably the leading expert when it comes to treating migraines with Botox.

The exact nature of Botox’s effect on migraines is so far unknown, but it is theorized that Botox interrupts the very same nerve impulses that cause migraines, which is very similar to its effects when used for cosmetic purposes. When used to treat migraines, Botox is injected at several spots around the forehead and scalp, and occasionally on the back of neck towards the base of the skull. This procedure takes less than fifteen minutes, and can be performed during a regular office visit, with the patient returning to work immediately. Patients typically see improvements in 2-3 days, and can experience relief for up to three months. The procedure is usually done again shortly before this deadline in order to extend the benefits.

Migraine Help from Doctor Binder

While Botox for migraines can be administered by many medical, and even non-medical professionals, getting help from the experts is much more likely to bring the targeted relief that migraine sufferers need. If you are suffering from migraines, contact Dr. William J Binder today to schedule a consultation and find out if you are a candidate for Botox-based migraine relief.

botox for migraine relief

The Beauty of Botox for Migraine Relief

Are you one of the 3.2 million Americans who live with chronic migraines? Are you tired of trying methods that aren’t working? Well Botox might be the answer to your problems.

What is Botox?

Botox is a well-known cosmetic procedure, most commonly used for reducing facial wrinkles. Botox refers to the brand name of a neurotoxin called botulinum toxin. Despite the complicated sounding name, the diluted form of botulinum toxin in Botox isn’t dangerous. It is administered through injections and allows the affected muscles to relax which reduces or removes wrinkles for up to three to four months.

Botulinum toxin injections have been among the most popular cosmetic procedure since 2000 and continue to increase in popularity. Botox is widely known as a cosmetic procedure but not very many people know that it was originally used as a medical treatment for an eye condition called strabismus. In the 1990s, Dr. Jean Carruthers quickly learned that Botox could be used to treat other medical conditions like face and neck spasms. Today, Botox is used for much more than just reducing wrinkles. Botox is being used to treat chronic pain, chronic migraines, excess sweating and depression. It is effective in most people because it prevents muscle contractions and spasms.

Botox has an older history than most people know. It gained FDA approval in 2002 as a cosmetic treatment, however Botox has been around for much longer than that. Botox is one of the safest and most researched products available on the market.

Botox the Right Way

Even though Botox is safe and well understood, choosing the right person to administer your treatment is essential in achieving the best possible results, especially if you need Botox for medical purposes. Botox must be applied carefully and precisely in order to target just the right muscles while still achieving a natural look, so patients should seek out a licensed and board certified plastic surgeon with ample experience administering Botox treatments.

Dr. William J. Binder is one of the world’s leading experts on Botox and, in fact, was the plastic surgeon who discovered the product’s applications for treating migraines. He is based out of Los Angeles but, due to his expertise and experience, patients from around the country and even the world come to receive treatment from him.

What is a Chronic Migraine?

Chronic migraines are a neurological condition that cause 15 or more headache days a month. Each headache lasts 4 hours or more. They can vary from mild to severe but overall are uncomfortable and unpleasant to deal with. Symptoms include the following:

• Nausea and/or vomiting
• Sensitivity to light and sound
• Change in vision
• Change in sensations and speech

People with chronic migraines experience these symptoms at least 8 days a month, every month.

How does Botox for Migraine Relief Work?

Botox for migraine injections are typically administered once every three months. The exact length of your treatments will be determined by your doctor depending on your needs and response to the Botox. A session to inject Botox is quick and only takes about 15 minutes to complete. The injections go into specific points along the bridge of your nose, your temples, your forehead, the back of your head, back of your neck, and upper back.

Botox treatments can help reduce the symptoms of migraines. This includes nausea, vomiting, and sensitivity to lights, sounds, and smells. After receiving Botox injections, it can take up to 10 to 14 days in order to start feeling the benefits of Botox.

Treatment

Dr. Binder is extensively published and is board certified by both the American Board of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, and the American Board of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. If you want your Botox treatments from one of the world’s leading plastic surgeons and experts in Botox, contact Dr. Binder’s office today to schedule your consultation.